An analysis of the dog buck

The Call of the Wild

Buck soon discovers that there are other dogs below deck, and after an indeterminate length of time, they all dock in a northern port, and there Buck encounters something entirely new: Bernard and half sheepdog, who is stolen from a California estate and sold as a sled dog in the Arctic.

Even though Buck recognizes that a man with a club is a master to be obeyed, yet Buck does not do what some dogs do — that is, he does not fawn upon the man-master, but then neither does Buck struggle for mastery for so long that he is killed in the struggle — as some dogs actually do.

In general, then, this chapter has taken Buck from the ease and comfort of civilization through his first encounter with the law of the primitive, when he was being beaten with a club, to his arrival somewhere in the Far North, and his true geographical entry into "the primitive.

Afterward, Buck is thrown into a cage. The three buy Buck and his team and try to drive them, but their inexperience makes them terrible masters, as they run out of food during the journey and bicker among themselves.

In the midst of a particularly arduous trip, one of the dogs becomes ill, and eventually the driver has to shoot him. It is ironic that in civilization, Buck was free to roam, but now, taken from his familiar surroundings, he is brutally flung into a cage.

Buck becomes the property of Francois and Perrault, two mail carriers working for the Canadian government, and begins to adjust to life as a sled dog.

This is how he learns to deal with the man in the red sweater, and throughout the rest of the novel, Buck will always remember the man with the red sweater, for this is his introduction to the "law of the club" and to the laws of the primitive world.

Halfway through their journey, they begin to run out of food. These dogs will later be sold to gold prospectors in the North. At the end of this journey, the dogs are exhausted, and the mail carrier sells them to a group of American gold hunters—Hal, Charles, and Mercedes. Buck gradually evolves from a pampered pet into a fierce, masterful animal, able to hold his own in the cruel, kill-or-be-killed world of the North.

Anthropomorphic simply means attributing human qualities to an animal.

It is obvious that Buck knows that he is beaten, but, as London tells us, Buck is not broken: Thornton saves Buck from death at the hands of Hal, and Buck rewards Thornton with fierce loyalty.

Thornton warns them that the ice over which they are traveling is melting and that they may fall through it. At Seattle, Buck is delivered into the hands of a "stout man with a red sweater and a club. Red, therefore, serves as a symbol of savagery.

He always returns to Thornton in the end, until, one day, he comes back to camp to find that Yeehat Indians have attacked and killed his master. Buck does not know that there is a "yellow metal" recently discovered in the Far North and that strong, powerful dogs are desperately needed and will bring a rather large price.

For example, throughout the novel, Buck will be seen to possess various types of qualities that are traditionally attributed only to human beings.

At first, it puzzles him, but when some onlookers laugh at him, he feels ashamed. While the men search for gold, Buck ranges far afield, befriending wolves and hunting bears and moose.

Her behavior, London suggests, demonstrates how civilized women are unsuited for life in the wild, having been spoiled and babied by the men around them. The "brumal sleep" refers to these forces that are hibernating and which will, at the proper moment, awaken and assume their bestial qualities.

He becomes a legendary figure, a Ghost Dog, fathering countless cubs and inspiring fear in the Yeehats—but every year he returns to the place where Thornton died, to mourn his master before returning to his life in the wild.

While the humans bicker, the dogs begin to starve, and the weaker animals soon die. Furthermore, he will never resent hard work — if it is administered with impartiality. They overload the sled, beat the dogs, and plan poorly.

Having established Buck, then, as a product of civilization, London will, as his chapter title "Into the Primitive" indicates, now show the contrast between Buck, the civilized dog, and the dog he becomes when be is suddenly thrust into a life completely different.We learn early on in Call of the Wild that Buck's father was a giant St.

Bernard and his mother was a Scotch shepherd dog. Buck is not as big as his father, but still weighs pounds. Buck is. Everything you ever wanted to know about Buck in The Call of the Wild, written by masters of this stuff just for you. Character Analysis Good Doggy.

Buck's the alpha dog. The top dog. The big dawg. You're a good dog, Buck. Yes you are. A Wolf In Dog's Clothing. A short summary of Jack London's The Call of the Wild. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of The Call of the Wild. Summary & Analysis; Chapter I: Into the Primitive; Chapter II: The Law of Club and Fang Buck, a powerful dog, half St.

Bernard and half sheepdog, lives on Judge Miller’s estate in California’s Santa. Get everything you need to know about Buck in The Call of the Wild.

Analysis, related quotes, timeline. The character of Buck in The Call of the Wild from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes. Sign In Sign Up. he becomes a powerful sled dog in the Canadian Klondike. As Buck goes deeper into the wilderness, he transforms from a pampered.

Buck - A powerful dog, half St. Bernard and half sheepdog, who is stolen from a California estate and sold as a sled dog in the Arctic. Buck gradually evolves from a pampered pet into a fierce, masterful animal, able to hold his own in the cruel, kill-or-be-killed world of the North.

Though he loves. While Buck is a very large dog — his father was a huge Saint Bernard and his mother was a Scotch shepherd — Buck has lived a comfortable life of ease in very civilized surroundings.

London writes that Buck "had lived the life of a sated aristocrat.".

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An analysis of the dog buck
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