An analysis of the role of salarino and solanio in the play the merchant of venice by william shakes

In reply, Bassanio admits that although he already owes Antonio a substantial sum of money from his earlier, more extravagant days, he has fallen in love with Portia, a rich heiress from Belmont, and hopes to win her heart by holding his own with her other wealthy and powerful suitors.

Act I, scenes i—ii The first scene of the play introduces us to a world of wealthy, upper-class Christian men living in Venice. He often uses certain characters as comic relief, and some strictly for romance. Each of these suitors has left without even attempting a guess for fear of the penalty for guessing wrong.

They are not in any way involved in the fight between Shylock and Antonio. For example, Salarino excuses himself by asserting that his only concern is to make Antonio merry and that he is leaving because better friends have arrived, but Antonio knows that Salarino is leaving to attend to his own business affairs.

Solanio then declares that Antonio must be in love, but Antonio dismisses the suggestion. Beyond this willingness to sacrifice himself for Bassanio, Antonio is a relatively passive character. They do not offer to help pay off Shylock.

We may infer that money is very important to these men, but the code of manners that they share requires them to act as though friendship, camaraderie, and good cheer matter more than money. He begins the play in a dreamy melancholy that he does not know how to cure, and throughout the play he never takes decisive action in the way that Bassanio, Portia, and various other characters do.

Where Bassanio is concerned, love and friendship really are more important to Antonio than money. For instance, she describes the Neapolitan prince as being too fond of his horse, the Palatine count as being too serious, the Englishman as lacking any knowledge of Italian or any of the other languages Portia speaks, and the German suitor of drunkenness.

The Merchant of Venice

They play a small but important supporting role in Merchant of Venice. Antonio asks Bassanio to tell him about the clandestine love that Bassanio is harboring. I call Salarino and Solanio bystanders because throughout the play they are never directly involved in the action.

Salarino and Solanio bid Antonio farewell and depart. They even satirize the drama. Another reason Solarino and Solanio can be seen as bystanders is that while they are friends with Antonio, they are aloof and less devoted to Antonio than Bassanio or Grationo. He approaches life with a pensive, resigned, wait-and-see attitude, like a merchant waiting for his ships to return.

Their interaction with Antonio is limited to act I. Hardison Certified Educator Salarino and Salanio are given the task of presenting information to the audience in Act II, Scene 8, because they can give candid reports about other characters and because they serve the important function of establishing foreshadowing.

The second is the Clown who is similar to the Fool except that the Clown is country bred and uneducated and leads the audience to a deeper understanding of the primary characters by blundering along without knowing what he is really doing.

Salarino and Solanio suggest that his sadness must be due to his commercial investments, for Antonio has dispatched several trade ships to various ports.

Salarino says it is impossible for Antonio not to feel sad at the thought of the perilous ocean sinking his entire investment, but Antonio assures his friends that his business ventures do not depend on the safe passage of any one ship.

Nerissa lists the suitors who have come to guess—a Neapolitan prince, a Palatine count, a French nobleman, an English baron, a Scottish lord, and the nephew of the duke of Saxony—and Portia criticizes their many hilarious faults. Salarino and Salanio are given the task of presenting information to the audience in Act II, Scene 8, because they can give candid reports about other characters and because they serve the important function of establishing foreshadowing.Get an answer for 'In Act II, Scene 8 of The Merchant of Venice, why does Shakespeare choose Solanio and Salarino to tell us information that they witnessed?' and find homework help for other The.

The Role of Salarino and Solanio in a Merchant of Venice essays and term papers available at mi-centre.com, the largest free essay community. Antonio A wealthy Venetian merchant who occasionally lends money, but never charges interest. Since his main source of income is from his merchant ships, he.

Get an answer for 'Why does Salarino refer to Antonio as the "two-headed Janus" in The Merchant of Venice? ' and find homework help for other The Merchant of Venice questions at eNotes.

The Role of Salarino and Solanio in a Merchant of Venice The Role of Salarino and Solanio in a Merchant of Venice The merchant of. Shylock - A Jewish moneylender in Venice.

The Role of Salarino and Solanio in a Merchant of Venice

Angered by his mistreatment at the hands of Venice’s Christians, particularly Antonio, Shylock schemes to eke out his revenge by ruthlessly demanding as payment a pound of Antonio’s flesh.

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An analysis of the role of salarino and solanio in the play the merchant of venice by william shakes
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